FAH/PHIL Guest Lecture – “The Democratic Exception: Resistance, Constituent Power, and the Making of Popular Sovereignty” by Prof. Andreas Kalyvas, The New School, New York, USA


Speaker:

Prof. Andreas Kalyvas, The New School, New York, USA

Date:

21 Mar 2017

Time:

10:00 - 12:00

Venue:

E21-3118

Description:

Abstract:

The paper traces the historical and conceptual birth of popular sovereignty in the mid-sixteenth century during the struggles against absolute monarchy and explores how doctrines of resistance brought together the idea of the constituent power of the multitude with the principle of the sovereignty of the people. The right of the many to disobey, resist, depose, or kill their (tyrannical) rulers was derived from their sovereign power to determine and establish the political forms of their common life, exemplified by the revolutionary principle that “those who constitute one form, may abrogate it.”  Based on this historical reconstruction, the paper defines popular sovereignty, in terms of the “Alter & Abolish” principle, as the power to institute forms of government, to abolish, change, and reform them.  Finally, the paper explores the implications of this insurgent doctrine of sovereignty to discuss issues pertaining to democracy and revolution, the federal form and its opposition to statocentric sovereignty, citizenship and the right to insurrection.

Audience:

All are welcome

Language:

English

Enquiry:

Philosophy and Religious Studies Programme
Tel: (853) 8822 4768
Email: fah.philosophy@umac.mo